“Possessing a common logic,” a series of discussions and collaborations between philosophers, theorists, artists, and performers with the invitation to uncover a common logic or underlying thread that connects their practices. Working toward resonances not necessarily similarities and shared ways of thinking not necessarily shared thoughts, the end result is unpredictable. This series aims to imagine new possibilities and projects through difference. It moves away from a purely critical mode of engagement, focusing, instead, on creation and construction. 

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Scholar/artist Vyta Pivo and philosopher Parish Conkling examine the social and political history of concrete. They explore the history of the material, ask why we rely on it for the construction of seemingly everything, and will put concrete into the broader context of sustainability and climate change.

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Philosopher Vera Albrecht and activist artist Courtney Frances explore metaphysical and philosophical perspectives of conceptual art in reference to Fallon’s 2017 protest project “Draw The Blue Line” – a multi-discipline art action about climate change where performance art turned into a police provocation and made international news.

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Philosopher Leslie A. Aarons and artist Julia Barbosa Landois discuss the importance of empathy in environmentalism and activism through the reading of “The Sense of Wonder: A Celebration of Nature for Parents and Children” written by marine biologist and conservationist Rachel Carson.

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Dr. James Ball (Texas A&M University), Jennifer Mabus (University of St. Thomas), and Melissa Noble (Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts) discuss performance and its overlap with politics in the institutional setting.

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Artist/scholar Isa Fontbona and scholar Camilla Cannon consider how we balance the Internet’s ability to combat societal incitements to shame through radical vulnerability and the reality of constant online surveillance.

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Lone Star College Philosophy Professor Vanessa Voss conspires against Jones’ conspiracy theories and looks at his work alongside comedian/performance artist Andy Kaufman. With the election getting closer talking heads are raising their voices. Conspiracy! Fraud! Corruption! Are they sharing vital information, perpetuating fake news, or making art? In 2017, right-wing radio host Alex Jones made a creative legal claim that his radio/television personality was simply a piece of performance art. Conspiracy or truth? Fake news or theater? Politics or performance? Originally curated for Revolution! Scholars and Artists Rethinking Political Action, cancelled due to COVID.

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Artist/theorist Maria Cecilia Azar and dance artist Miranda Zapata discuss the importance of reclaiming and honoring stories in art and writing through decolonized creative practices in academic and non-academic projects.